A blend of the right capabilities will deliver better outcomes

Earlier this week I attended IBM THINK Collaboration London – an opportunity to hear more about the latest updates to their collaboration suite and more importantly for me, a chance to really understand how Watson will help make organisations more efficient.

During my 13 years in-house I used a mix of social intranets (wordpress with buddypress), SharePoint and IBM Connections. At most conferences or events I attend about internal social channels we hear about Facebook Workplace, Microsoft, Jive etc but never IBM Connections – which is a shame because having used this for four years (both as an internal customer and as the global lead for the platform) it is the best solution I have found.

Cognitive intelligence with people at the heart
The founding principles of IBM Connections are people and choice and the basic elements of the platform are brilliant. When you start that internal change conversation with the basics – files and spaces to collaborate (Communities) the conversations in each part of the organisation are easy. Files are all in one place. You choose whether to share with an individual, a group of people, a community or make it completely public. I might even choose to just have it restricted so only I can see it. It even comes with a plug in to Windows so as a user I can see the familiar file and folder structure of a shared drive.

One of my main challenges with other platforms is this lack of one version of the truth. I want one file (with version control) that I can surface in different places and I want it to be easy for people to know where to put that file – this comes as standard.

With the introduction of Orient Me, IBM Connections can now offer a home page that is tailored to the individual. Surfacing content that is relevant allowing the user to pin communities, files, people in their network – this allows them to reduce the noise and see the relevant information to them.

I can tailor the design of the communities. I don’t need IT to help or an expert partner – I can do this and any of the employees in my organisation can do it as well. This ability to be able to have control over how the platform can work is brilliant. With every other platform I have experienced, I have needed IT or an external partner to create spaces and templates for me – not with IBM.

Deliver business outcomes faster
Watson is impressive. Watson Workspace is equally exciting. The use of AI in the platform means it not only helps the user based on keywords but it also understands intent – and you can help it learn too.

It can support the organisation in a variety of ways:

  • Watson Workspace will surface data regardless of source – if it is connected to CRM platforms, HR systems – pretty much anything – it can surface any of that content to help you – saving you the time to search
  • It works both ways. Using the workflow application you can sign off a sales deal that can then trigger an action in one of the platforms it integrates with – making you and your team more efficient
  • Watson technology can be used to search through social media channels for keywords and automatically create a space in Workspace, adding the relevant people into it, to solve an issue raised by a customer or employee
  • The platform understands the context of the conversation so you can summarise the discussion based on that context and build custom actions that can be fulfilled, all using the cognitive power of Watson
  • The cognitive capabilities can be extended into other existing applications, enabling you to summarise, gain focus and insight on data in 3rd party business apps
  • And the future is looking impressive with plans to integrate the technology with video chat/video meetings to make them more efficient

All about choice
Choice can be tricky. Sometimes too much can make it difficult to make decisions, but having a business model that has acquired businesses with expertise, created partnerships with some of the leading technology providers and created a stack that people are learning at college means they are flexible. I still have conversations about why I would use Box when I have files in IBM Connections but it has a place for some. The choice is there to ensure that you can create the right solution for your business. IBM work with Microsoft, Google, Jive and others to make sure they stay true to keeping people at the heart of the offer.

For me, the blend of the technology has to support the business strategy and in the communications function, this should include providing platforms and content that supports it all. I had my frustrations with IBM Connections when it first arrived and when I had to do upgrades and some things would break – but it is technology and we learnt that a close partnership with IT was needed to make it a true success. I have used other platforms since and it was painful. None of them have come close to the empowerment IBM Connections gives, the ability to collaborate with external parties, nor do they provide the seamless file sharing element I used heavily.

As they said at the event this week; you can integrate anything but what is meaningful? It is this question that should bring the IT, HR and Communications function together to create the right solution for your business – I just hope you add IBM to the list of providers who can help.

From informing to engaging: the role of IC in driving engaging and authentic leadership communications

This morning CIPR Inside and Luminous hosted an Ask the Guru event all about the shift from informing to engaging audiences inside organisations.

As the Chair of CIPR Inside I was there to open the event and facilitate any questions. The event was designed to explore the role of internal communication in driving engaging and authentic leadership communication. With guest speaker Graham Cox, Director of Learning and Development at Boundaries Edge and Mark Litchfield, Executive Creative Director at Luminous they took us on a journey of authenticity, decision making, perception, creativity and measurement.

Understanding how we make decisions

As we set the scene to understand the role of authenticity it was helpful to better understand how we make decisions and where the logic and emotion come in. I’m already a big fan of Simon Sinek and his golden circle theory so it was great to kick off with a reminder about the mammalian brain (feelings) and neocortex (logic) and how 86% of decisions are based on feelings.

What was equally interesting was the fact that as we evolve we should become more logical in our decision-making but with the introduction of AI the need for us to make logical decisions is diminishing.

The six rules of perception

  1. Initial impression resists change, and perception resets every 10/15 seconds
  2. We have confirmation bias, we self-validate – if there is more investment the individual is less likely to change their mind
  3. We cannot hold two precepts in the mind at one time
  4. Perception is directly related to context, so we have to remind people about context all the time. This is linked to the fact that we don’t know how to calculate value
  5. We perceive losses three times more that we do gains. It is this focus on losses and therefore fear of them that leads us to stay in jobs we don’t enjoy or relationships that don’t work
  6. People perceive the past, present and future – and different groups of people will have a tendency to focus on one element more than the other

Engage audiences through creativity and measure how you do it

  • To help with creativity look around you. Benchmark with peers and be inspired by things outside of your everyday
  • Consistency is important
  • Create a central bank of assets to support both the consistency and to help with efficiencies in the team
  • Create a two-way conversation with relevance and measurement; define the metrics upfront, be clear about the audience and who to target, and get qualitative and quantitative feedback

As we finished the morning I shared the Making it Count research with the attendees as this is all about understanding the value and effectiveness of internal communication – and if we find it difficult to calculate value and our perception is directly related to context, I hope this helps us move forwards into more engaging conversations.

Why internal communication is the key to brand authenticity

This morning I attended a breakfast event hosted by VMA Group on the topic of authenticity. The session was led by Matt Hampshire from MK and he was supported by Ed Austin from Wagamama and together they took us through five rules for authenticity.

During the hour they took us through examples from Wagamama as well as some from other organisations – some who get it right and some who get it wrong. As someone who has spent most of their internal communications career working with employees who are predominantly offline it was great to hear a clear message about customer service and organisational purpose – so here are the five rules and how internal communicators can play a role in brand authenticity:

  1. Know who you are
    Looking back to a 1971 Coca-Cola advert and comparing it to a 2017 Pepsi advert reminds us all to stay true to who we are and not jump on a bandwagon. The backlash to Pepsi was huge with an estimated loss of $40m and an advert pulled after huge criticism all over the world.  The identity of the organisation can come from iconic leaders – Steve Jobs and Anita Roddick were just two examples shared – but having a strong purpose and a clear understanding of what your organisation is about will allow you to demonstrate who you are through good communication.
  2. Embrace the truth (even when it is uncomfortable)
    Last year someone shared a photo of a poster in a Wagamama restaurant that clearly told employees they would be disciplined if they called in sick. The first thing Wagamama’s did was talk to their employees – using all their channels they quickly communicated to all employees that this was in fact not the case. It was important for them to keep the conversation going and explain the truth behind the headlines.
  3. What you do is more important than what you say
    Quite often the conversations we have inside organisations will be around values and how we can put a poster on a wall to share them so that people know what they are. Sadly, this rarely works simply because what you do is more important than what you say. If one of your values is respect but it is accepted that people are late for meetings or on their phone during meetings then this doesn’t match. For many, the focus is on the profit and company results and this can lead to behaviour that might go against how we want to be perceived – as Ed said, “If you focus too much on the numbers, you lose focus on the service. Sales will follow if the service is there.”
  4. Start with the right people
    If 72% of people are judged on their CV alone then how can we be sure we are hiring the right people? When we think about employee engagement and employee experience, we need to start at the beginning. The whole employee journey needs to be considered to make sure that the people we train and invest in are committed to the organisation. The example about Zappos giving people £2,000 to not take a job was an interesting example to show how some companies ensure they only hire people who really want to be there.
  5. It’s not about you, it’s about them
    I have spent many meetings discussing this with leadership teams – explaining that they aren’t the audience for some of these messages. The example from Wagamama about the introduction of their Vegan menu was founded on co-creation. Inviting employees who choose a vegan diet to meet with the Executive Chef and discuss the menu, taste it and get involved in what good service looks like for them was fundamental to the roll out of the new dishes. As he said “it’s not about jumping on a bandwagon, it’s about embracing it”

At the end of the session there were some questions about corporate reputation, downloading apps to phones and how to engage cynical employees – all these questions were from different industries and they highlighted the different challenges we can all face in the different cultures we work in. The solution? Come back to these five rules and think about how to apply them in your business, they are core  principles and as a guide, they should work for everyone.

Employee engagement isn’t about happiness, it’s about outcomes

Is employee engagement still on your agenda? A few weeks I blogged on AB thinks (for my client AB) about employee engagement and employee experience – here are my thoughts on how things have changed…

Today commentators are using a new term – employee experience – described as the next competitive frontier for organisations. The challenge is to understand and create a culture where people can perform at their best. In short, to understand what makes humans thrive.

In October the importance of good mental health in the workplace came under scrutiny. Rightly, wellbeing, self-care and societal pressures are still hot topics. Earlier this year, reports suggested the link between serotonin and depression could be false and poor mental health might have a far deeper cause.

“We all know that every human being has basic physical needs: for food, for water, for shelter, for clean air. It turns out that, in the same way, all humans have certain basic psychological needs. We need to feel we belong. We need to feel valued. We need to feel we’re good at something. We need to feel we have a secure future. And there is growing evidence that our culture isn’t meeting those psychological needs for many – perhaps most – people.” Johann Hari, Author

To explore how this translates into the workplace, we need to look at employee engagement – or the employee experience – differently. Engagement is a result. It is an output. It is the consequence of a variety of factors happening simultaneously. We therefore need to think about the entire experience our employees have, from that job advert that initially caught their eye to their final exit interview.

A recent article from Jamie Nutter, maintains: “When you measure engagement, you are documenting a state of mind among your employees that was created over a period of months or years — in the past. That means that your detailed (and depressing) picture of today’s disengaged workforce, unfortunately, gives you very little you can use to actually solve the problem.”
This is a huge step forward in understanding employee engagement. Just six years ago we were having to define the difference between happiness and engagement.

Kevin Kruse explains: “Someone can be happy at work, but not ‘engaged’. They might be happy because they are lazy and it’s a job with not much to do. They might be happy talking to all their work-friends… to have a free company car. They might just be a happy person. But! Just because they’re happy doesn’t mean they are working hard on behalf of the company. They can be happy and unproductive. When someone is engaged, it means they are emotionally committed to their company and their work goals. They care about their work. They care about results. This makes them go above and beyond—to give discretionary effort.”

So where does this leave us? Employee engagement has never been better understood. As communicators we need to use the growing body of research to help us understand the complexity of human beings, how we thrive and how our organisations can create a culture that enables everyone to perform at their best.

This piece from Denise Lee Yohen nicely outlines what employee experience is and is not. It also explains why it’s something that should be on your agenda this year

Tips for communicating with volunteers

Last week I was asked for some insight into volunteer communication on the back of my involvement with the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR). I have been working with CIPR for a number of years and leading the internal communications group has given me some understanding of what to consider when communicating and engaging a network of volunteers.

These were the tips I shared and I’d be interested to hear from anyone working with volunteers who can share any further tips or advice for those communicating and engaging with this stakeholder group:

  • There will be different roles for the volunteers, so understanding them and their level of engagement with the centre is important
  • Be clear about what is a must do, nice to do and completely optional. Volunteers have limited time so it is good to know what is required
  • Recognise their contribution – whether this is doing something in-kind or having an event for them – make sure they feel valued
  • Give them plenty of notice – provide key dates and minimal information and then more detail closer to the date – the more notice they have to plan things the better
  • If the volunteers work together, explore running a workshop for them to discuss their purpose/reason for volunteering and then sharing a common goal and ways to share information and ideas – either with an online platform
  • Explore a suite of channels for them – just like you would for employees – they might want a regular newsletter of information that is specific to volunteers separate from other employee comms
  • Have clear guidelines available for them when they join – what is expected in terms of time etc. and provide a clear structure of meetings/touchpoints with the centre

What would you add to the list?

What I heard at the National Housing Federation Comms Event 2018

Yesterday I was invited to speak at the National Housing Federation Comms Event in London to talk about how you can demonstrate impact and value in internal communications. I hadn’t attended a specific housing event before and it was great to see over 250 people together to learn, discuss and network about challenges and share successes.

Interestingly all the speakers were from outside the housing sector so I was lucky enough to hear how behavioural insights can impact bottom line, what Macmillan Cancer Support is doing to engage a workforce spread across the office and the road and some truly inspiring case studies highlighting what to do in a crisis.

These were my highlights:

EAST Framework: Four simple ways to apply behavioural insights

I have always believed in the power of personalisation so I loved listening to Ed Fitzhugh talking about how it made a measurable impact in changing behaviour. We don’t do much of this internally but the best social intranet I built was personalised as people could subscribe to content relevant to them – it made cutting through the noise much easier!

The framework he covered can be found here. EAST stands for Easy, Attractive, Social and Timely.

The examples shared included simple changes like directing people to the form online rather than a website – removing a click to make it easier for people to get to the information we want them to get to.  Using personalised content that is more attractive by referencing details about your car or your registration to pay tax in time. I enjoyed the reference to nudge theory (especially as the #icbookclub choice for this month is Inside the Nudge Unit) and how using social norms can drive change – using phrases like nine out of ten people pay on time. Using texts with a combination of the personalisation and social norms at times that will generate the best responses was a good reminder of the importance of different mediums.

Pledge to Polly and Yambassadors!

The campaign examples from Macmillan Cancer Research were a good reminder of the use of creativity and humour in the workplace. The pledge to Polly campaign was all about encouraging people to read and follow policies – with a video, poster campaigns and a bit of humour they engaged employees across the business.

Having introduced O365 in the business they embarked on an engagement and adoption campaign around Yammer – there were some great examples shared about how they did this and some top tips to get the basics right (remove technical barriers, integrate, tailor training and support, recruit yambassadors and have a strong internal comms presence).

When it’s a crisis, it’s always about people

This whistle-stop tour of crisis comms included Amanda Coleman from Greater Manchester Police, Alicia Custis from Stockport NHS Foundation Trust and Nicola King from Teneo Blue Rubicon. I would have loved to have spent more time on these sessions as what they had to share was incredibly helpful and relevant for every comms professional.

There were so many takeaways from this session but here the list I captured from the sessions:

  • Put people, victims and families at the heart and ensure they remain the priority
  • There were five elements to reputation management: Media, Social Media, Stakeholders, Police, Victims and Families
  • Be prepared
  • Ensure people are media trained – I know a great trainer for this if you’re looking!
  • Have good relationships with the media
  • The communications strategy needs to be integrated across social media, digital and your channels
  • Credibility is key

Be strategic with the tactical

During my session on internal communication I shared my model for internal communication – a model I always used when in-house – and I shared five top tips to help you demonstrate value and create impact:

  1. Have data to support your business case and to measure success
  2. Invest in yourself – your opinion is not good enough in the boardroom
  3. Have a conversation – don’t be afraid to ask what value looks like to them
  4. Be strategic with the tactical
  5. Solve business problems with better communication

Thank you to the National Housing Federation communications team for organising a great day with some fantastic speakers. You can follow all the updates on Twitter under #nfhcomms18

Four things I heard at the Employee Engagement Awards Conference

Last week I attended my first Employee Engagement Awards Conference – hosted by Ruth Dance and organised by Matt Manners and the team behind the global employee engagement awards.

I was excited to attend a conference dedicated to employee engagement as it’s been a while since I attended something that wasn’t focussed purely on communication.

There were some great case studies and as I was only there for the morning, it gave me time to reflect on some of the themes in the case studies:

1. Employee experience is the new employee engagement
Although the two are different, we seem to be talking more about the whole employee experience than ever before. I have always talked about the difference between employee engagement and internal communication and I believe that the employee experience is the term that could join us together to support organisations empower the workforce.

2. Leadership style makes all the difference
It was brilliant to hear some fantastic case studies from Southampton FC and HomeServe and as I listened to the campaigns and the leadership styles that engaged the workforce it struck me that not everyone is that lucky. Not all leaders feel the same about internal communication or the employee experience – I have been lucky enough to work with both but I think the most rewarding work has been when you are challenged to really demonstrate how what you do can add value and make an impact.

3. Customer service and the employee experience need to have the same focus
Save the shoes! I loved the story from Temkin Group about how a focus on loss prevention can make the job for the employee incredibly difficult which in turn can lead to a bad customer experience. The other day I was discussing exactly this in a workshop where we talked about creating policies for the few rather than the many – sadly it does seem to be the norm, often going against the purpose of the organisation.

Hearing from M&S about their campaign to engage sector managers from their head of customer experience just reinforced the point that what goes on on the inside shows up on the outside (a phrase I heard first at the CIPR Inside conference in November and something I know Rachel Miller is presenting on at the IOIC conference in May).

4. Think strategically about your communication model
It’s easy to find a communication fix to one business problem – it’s harder to review it alongside others and create a strategy and plan that joins the dots. I heard some great case studies and great examples of campaigns to engage managers but worryingly some were in isolation to the broader communication strategy. In my experience this has a good quick win but without the thinking behind it and the overarching strategy it is unlikely to succeed long term. We know from the latest research from Gatehouse that there are still few internal comms teams with a strategy in place and I think a lot of this is down to the immediacy we live in today. Always take the time to think about how you’re going to engage and communicate with your workforce, manage stakeholders and align the timescales and it will create lasting change rather than a quick fix.

Thank you to Matt and the team – I left the morning with some great ideas for clients and a reinforcement that data and customer engagement go hand in hand with internal communications .